Do I Have to Retire to Enroll in Medicare?

Do I Have to Retire to Enroll in Medicare?
Medicare

When you reach the Medicare eligibility age of 65, you can enroll. In reality, you have three months to enroll in Medicare before you turn 65.

However, some people may be eligible for benefits even though they are under the age of 65. A diagnosis of End-Stage Renal Disease, for example, could qualify you for Medicare at any age.

 

What if I want to work past the age of 65?

 

Working past the age of 65 is popular among Baby Boomers. Fortunately, once you reach the age of 65, your employment status has no bearing on your eligibility for Medicare.

You will continue to work when receiving Medicare benefits. Medicare could also be less expensive than the benefits provided by your employer. Plus, even after you convert to Medicare, you can use the funds in your health savings account (HSA) to pay for medical expenses.

If you work for a corporation with 20 or fewer employees, you must transition to a Medicare plan once you reach retirement age. Regardless of your retirement plans, this is real.

 

But what about my husband or wife?

 

Unlike employer-sponsored programs, Medicare plans do not allow dependents. If your partner is not covered by your employer's insurance, he or she will need to make plans for health coverage once you begin Medicare.

 

Do I Have to Retire to Enroll in Medicare?

 

If your partner is 65 years old or older

 

If you and your partner are both over the age of 65, enrolling in Medicare as a couple is the most cost-effective choice. You may each select a plan that works for you based on your specific health care needs.

 

Also Read: Do Medicare Advantage Different Based on Where You Live?

 

If your partner is under the age of 65

 

When you switch to Medicare, he or she has two choices for coverage. They are able to:

  • Get coverage from a personal insurance policy.

  • Recipients of payments from their employer (if they qualify)

 

Our advisors will help your spouse select an individual health plan that will cover the difference before he or she reaches the Medicare eligibility period.

 

Working Past 65: Health Plan Recommendations

 

Meeting the Medicare age requirement is just the beginning. If you're curious, "Do I have to retire to participate in Medicare?" or have other Medicare-related queries, we can help.

Call  (844)731-6614 to speak with one of our Medicare experts.

 

 

 

 

 

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