Understanding Medicare Part A and Part B (Original Medicare)

Understanding Medicare Part A and Part B (Original Medicare)
Medicare

If you've had employer-sponsored health insurance for the majority of your life, you've probably never had a reason to choose between the various components of your coverage. Medicare, on the other hand, has split hospital insurance (Medicare Part A) from private insurance (Medicare Part B). The costs and coverage of Medicare Parts A and B vary, but registration and eligibility are essentially the same.

What is the difference between Medicare Part A and Part B coverage?

Medicare Part A and Part B cover different things, and there is generally no overlap in coverage. Here are some examples.

 

Medicare Part A Coverage Medicare Part B Coverage
  • Skilled nursing facility care

  • Hospice care

  • Limited home health care

  • Your hospital room and hospital meals

  • General nursing

  • Prescription drugs received in the hospital

  • Annual physical exam

  • Durable medical equipment including wheelchairs and walkers

  • Emergency ambulance transportation

  • Physical, occupational, and speech therapy

  • Some preventive exams, tests, and screenings

  • Doctor visits both to primary care doctor and specialists

  • Some vaccines, including the flu shot

  • Mental health services

When it comes to costs, what's the difference between Medicare Part A and Part B?

 

The rates, deductibles, and coinsurance amounts for Medicare Part A and Part B are different.

 

 

Medicare Part A

Medicare Part B

Premiums

Part A is open for the majority of citizens. If you're 65 and already earn Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board payments, you might be eligible for premium-free Part A. If you're under 65 and have accrued Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board disability insurance for the previous 24 months, you will get Part A without paying a premium.

The majority of people have to pay a premium for Medicare Part B. In 2021, the regular Part B premium will be $148.50, or more depending on your salary.

Deductibles

The Medicare Part A deductible will be $1,484 per payout duration in 2021.

In 2021, the Medicare Part B deductible would be $203 a year.

Coinsurance

For some days in the hospital after day 60, you must pay a Part A coinsurance (a fixed dollar amount). In 2021, this number will be $371 per day for days 61 through 90, and $742 per day for days 91 and beyond. You will have to pay all costs if you use up all 60 of your "lifetime reserve days."

Under Medicare Part B, you pay 20% of the Medicare-approved cost for most doctor services. Until you receive a bill, you won't know the exact dollar amount.

 

What is the difference between Medicare Part A and Part B

 

What is the difference between Medicare Part A and Part B eligibility?

 

Medicare is available to people 65 and older, as well as those with disabilities, such as End-Stage Renal Disease. You must also have lived in the United States for at least five years as a citizen or permanent legal resident. At the same time, you become eligible for Medicare Parts A and B.

 

If you meet the following criteria, you will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B

 

Before you turn 65, you've been getting Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board payments for at least 4 months. For the past 24 months, you've been earning disability payments. You will not be fully enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B if you are already employed when you turn 65. You can choose to enroll in Medicare Part A if it is available without a premium, but put off enrolling in Part B because it requires payment of a premium.

 

 

Learn More About  Medicare

(844)731-6614

 

 

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