Why Pneumococcal Vaccine is so Important When you are 65

Why Pneumococcal Vaccine is so Important When you are 65
Medicare Medicare Supplement

For people 65 and older, the pneumococcal vaccine is important. Lately, there has been a lot of debate about vaccines, their efficacy, and whether they actually work. For my older patients, one vaccine I still prescribe is the pneumococcal vaccine. I recently got mine and feel much better as a result.

Here is what you need to know about pneumococcal vaccines

There are two types of pneumococcal vaccines

PCV13 (Prevnar 13®) and PPSV23 (Pneumovax 23®) are the two forms of pneumococcal vaccine. If you are 65 or older, one dose of each is prescribed, and you should take them at least one year apart.

Lots of severe diseases are avoided

To avoid pneumonia, an infection in the lungs that can be life-threatening, it is very effective to get vaccinated. It can protect you from meningitis, infections of the bloodstream, and ear infections as well. Our immune systems weaken as we age and it's more difficult to fight off infections. That's why it's so critical to provide this vaccine for older adults.

Here is what you need to know about pneumococcal vaccines

There are minimal side effects.

This vaccine is not only effective, it's really healthy as well. The side effects are mild and, like any other shot, can include redness, swelling, and soreness at the injection site. Fever, chills, or muscle aches are less common side effects, but these usually fade quickly.

It has Medicare coverage.

Both forms of pneumococcal vaccines are covered whether you have medical benefits offered by the federal government (also known as Medicare Part B) or a Medicare plan from a private insurance provider. Currently, when granted at least 12 months apart, they are covered 100 percent. read more about the way Medicare covers vaccines.


Get your pneumococcal vaccine if you haven’t already. It's one of the safest ways to protect yourself after 65 years of age from severe infections, and it will help keep you safe and do what you enjoy most.

And note, if you have a private insurance plan you can still contact your member services team with any concerns about coverage.

 

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